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Welcome.

We’re an arts publication that explores humanity’s complicated relationship to land.

Jeff Schofield

Jeff Schofield

Statement

My large scale art installations seek to convey ecological concerns of life in the Anthropocene. I upcycle found objects and natural materials into artwork addressing sustainable themes. I create site-specific interventions exploring critical narratives about our consumer culture that question the sustainability of post-industrial society. By celebrating natural phenomena as essential elements of human existence, my artwork explores positive strategies to promote a healthy environment for future generations to enjoy.


Desert Series

In the desert surrounding Abu Dhabi, the capital city of the United Arab Emirates, high-tension power lines cross the landscape, and cast shadows on the sand dunes. The lines emphasize the organic forms of the dunes. While camping in the desert, I awoke to find footsteps placed in the sand dunes by animals during the night. I added a set of footsteps of my own, using local reeds and my artist paints. The fence consists of materials found on site during a camping trip. Even in the remotest parts of the desert discarded construction materials litter the landscape. All materials were found in the desert along roadways and in parking lots. The photographs were taken about 1 week after installing the compositions in the sand dunes, after the winds had blown away all traces of human presence.

Lines
Shadows on sand dunes
Approx. 100 x 100 x 1,000 feet each

In the desert surrounding Abu Dhabi, the capital city of the United Arab Emirates, high-tension power lines cross the landscape, and cast shadows on the sand dunes. The lines emphasize the organic forms of the dunes.

Centipede
Painted wood reeds on sand dune
20 feet long, 4 inches high

While camping in the desert, I awoke to find footsteps placed in the sand dunes by animals during the night. I added a set of footsteps of my own, using local reeds and my artist paints.

Don’t Fence Me In
Wood reeds and recycled steel reinforcing bars on sand dune
50 feet long and 10 feet high

The fence consists of materials found on site during a camping trip. Even in the remotest parts of the desert discarded construction materials litter the landscape.

Metal Plants
Aerosol cans, metal straps & wires, and recycled steel reinforcing bars on sand dune
Approx. 4 x 2 x 2 feet high each

All materials were found in the desert along roadways and in parking lots. The photographs were taken about 1 week after installing the compositions in the sand dunes, after the winds had blown away all traces of human presence.


Forest Series

Repair
Gold paint in asphalt parking lot pavement
30 x 30 feet
Collaboration with Saree Silverman

This art installation reinterprets Kintsugi, the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with gold, a philosophy which treats breakage and repair as part of the history of an object, rather than something to disguise. This parking lot is also a man-made vessel, designed to hold motor vehicles, made from extremely toxic petroleum by-products. In time it decays as nature reclaims the site. But it breaks up along natural lines, and the cracks follow organic patterns, like a tree branch or a river delta. “Repair” celebrates aspects of time and chance in relation to human interventions in the natural environment.

Outside Ourselves
Pear tree branches mounted in a white cube space
20 x 20 x 10 feet
Collaboration with Saree Silverman

Last winter this pear tree, located in the Detroit metro area, was blown down during a storm. We picked up the branches out of the snow and installed them in a white cube for display. This installation contrasts the geometric with the organic, the mineral with the natural. The strong shadows cast on the wall represent the tree branches abstractly and coldly, while the real branches continue to live on the wall for a short time. While pear trees are beautiful when in full bloom, they are not native to Michigan, but are transplanted for aesthetic purposes. Upon growing to full height they always get destroyed in the brittle cold climate with strong winter winds. Nature allows only a limited amount of transgressions on ecosystems before resetting a new balance.

Nurse Log
Wood beads nailed into a nurse log
10 feet long and 1 foot diameter

The fallen log has been decaying for years, lying across a footpath in the woods, and is growing a healthy moss covering. Colorful beads follow the wood grain and express the processes of future growth that this nurse log will facilitate. As they decay, nurse logs offer seedlings shade, nutrients, water and protection from disease and pathogens, thus nurturing and making way for the new generation. They play an important role in the constant renewal that prevails in a healthy forest. By providing a growth substrate that is different from the rest of the forest floor, they increase the diversity of habitats for the new generation of trees.

Split Tree Trunk
Metal beads nailed into a split tree trunk
10 feet high and 2 feet diameter

The split tree trunk deep in the woods has decayed to the point of rot. The metal beads follow the wood grain and express processes of fungal growth and other spore invasions that will soon overcome the dead plant.

Pawel Grajnert

Pawel Grajnert

Annabelle Dustan

Annabelle Dustan