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Welcome.

We’re an arts publication that explores humanity’s complicated relationship to land.

Ramon Jimenez Cardenas

Ramon Jimenez Cardenas

Statement

As an artist, most of my practice is about man-made structures that may already exist out in the world. The more polemical the structure is, the more I am driven to deconstruct it and make it my own. I find these contested structures, which I'm trying to describe, to be this peculiar arrangement in space, where policies, morals, and desires larger than one's self often collide. And as a designer, I often feel like I am allowing myself to keep the human body in perspective to these structures, as well as giving the viewer a more intimate scale to deal with these larger conflicts.


Mending Wall
2018
powder coated rebar, and steel
12" x 14" x 10"

Mending Wall is a series of eight grappling hooks, each designed to overcome a corresponding prototype of President Trump’s proposed border wall between the United States and Mexico. The title is a reference to Robert Frost’s poem also named “Mending Wall,” which narrates a relationship between two neighbors that meet yearly to repair a wall that divides their property. Linking Frost’s poem with the contemporary issues that these eight grappling hooks bring to light allows discussion of divisive global borders both poetically and politically.

Disturbed Stream
2018
ceramics, bronze, and aluminum
18" x 14" x 10"

These are multi-pronged drinking straw inspired by the aqueduct in the city of Oaxaca, Mexico. Over the years the aqueduct in the city of Oaxaca has been contested and disrupted not only by corruption in local politics, but also by the community itself. Roads, staircases, and even houses have been built over and across the aqueduct. These multiple broken sites become an explicit metaphor for how our accessibility to water is sometimes taken for granted. This research led to rethinking the typology of the straw as a contextual object to explore storytelling.

Response #12
2018
wood, steel, and cement
7’ x 4’ x 5’

Response #12 is the first of many poetic interpretations of a broken site. This particular site is located at the end of Jacarandas Street in Oaxaca, Mexico. The street ends with the aqueduct’s wall and a steel staircase on the side, which climbs up and across the aqueduct. This staircase was built by the community for easy crossing, and it’s one of many human interventions that metaphorically disrupts the flow of the aqueduct.

Craftsmanship of the Unfair
2018
wood, scaffolding, cement, and steel
6.5’ x 3’ x 2’

This installation depicts a ladder, scaffolding, and a sewage cap. Together they reveal the narrative of a deadly accident and seek a place for blame in the unfairness in labor. The accident was a pedestrian falling into a sewage system during a flooding and drowning. Whose fault was it? The weather? The pedestrian not taking enough precautions during the conditions? The sewage cap not being placed properly? Missing sewage cap? Someone not reporting it? The list could go on and on, which brings one last question to mind: do we have to blame someone for it? Or was is just that: an accident?

Adela C. Licona + Cara Hagan

Adela C. Licona + Cara Hagan

Frances Garcia Orellana

Frances Garcia Orellana