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We’re an arts publication that explores humanity’s complicated relationship to land.

Natasha Mijares

Natasha Mijares

Statement

This piece is concerned with the propensity of death that occurs towards the end of summer when yellow warblers are migrating south and the mental, psychological, and the emotional relationships that humans have to this process.

Bio

Natasha Mijares is an artist, writer, curator, and educator. She received her MFA in Writing from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She has exhibited at MECA International Art Fair in Puerto Rico, The Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design, TCC Chicago, and Locust Projects. She has been published in Container, Vinyl Poetry, The Gravity of the Thing, and Hypertext Magazine.


“YELLOW WARBLER”
by Natasha Mijares

We are just flight feathers. The remiges and rectrices are blackish olive with yellow edges, sometimes appearing as an indistinct wing-band on the former. The eyes and the short thin beak are dark, while the feet are lighter or darker olive-buff. The yellow warbler collides with many things. Etymologically, it comes from the ancient Greek word for “moth” and “eating.” Mangroves, crowns, hoods, or masks. Warbling as a cry for becoming. When nodules begin to sprout inside of our chords, the future provides us with synthetic materials to make them soft. Woolen body or 3-D printed song.

By the end of August, the bulk of the northern populations have moved south. In their migration, the edifices of post offices, super conglomerates, and neighborhood schools are all colliders with warblers. Particularly, the windows. A cross-section a warbler, like a window, requires four parts.

  1. What you know about yourself

  2. What other people know about you

  3. What you don’t know about yourself

  4. What other people don’t know about you

  1. Open/free

  2. Blind

  3. Hidden

  4. Unknown

  1. What you know about yourself that is open and free

  2. What other people know about you that is blind to you

  3. What you don’t know about yourself that is hidden to others

  4. What other people don’t know about you that is unknown to yourself

The warbler collides with an ability that is under-estimated or un-tried through lack of opportunity, encouragement, confidence, or training. The warbler collides with a natural ability or aptitude that a person doesn’t realize they possess. The warbler collides with a fear or aversion that a person does not know they have. The warbler collides with an unknown illness. The warbler collides with a repressed or subconscious feeling. The warbler collides with a conditioned behavior or attitude from childhood.

At the feet of the edifices are recoiled springs. The warblers at rest are their own kind of song. A bottleneck or the neck of a bottle. There are many things that are mistaken for death. How to investigate when we are living and when we are passed somewhere we thought we knew. An identity that has become origami and sold in a gift shop to unsuspecting tourists. How to lift out of your own body—a new light or an old light unscrewed, the halogen spills out, knowing angel, heaven, and the feeling there.

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